May 07, 2017

Horror Feast

Over the last few weeks I have watched horror films of all kinds. It is interesting how this genre is not limited to stories where a spirit attacks or possesses humans, and antagonists of different kinds can create similar emotional impact, a catharsis of sorts, as evident by the following movies I watched recently:
  • The Cabin in the Woods (2012/ USA) by Drew Goddard: An exaggerated celebration of the genre, this is one of the most audaciously original genre movies I have seen. Super fun. You should be extremely open-minded when you sit for this. I almost recommended it as a must-watch-before-you-die.
  • What We Do in the Shadows (2014/ New Zealand) by Jemaine Clement and Taika Waititi: This is a horror mockumentary. And is really, really funny. Anyone should watch and enjoy it, even those who don't like to be scared. It is again more a tribute to the genre than something that will scare you.
  • The Host (2006/ South Korea) by Bong Joon-ho: No supernatural here, but an animal, a monster created by man's apathy toward nature. It is a typical creature horror extravaganza and has nothing subtle or artistic about it. But can be fun for most.
  • Inside (2007/ France) by Julien Maury and Alexandre Bustillo: This is a movie I'll certainly not recommend to anyone. Do not watch it. If you are a woman, definitely stay away. Here again, the threat does not come from a spirit, but a brutal home invasion. You think you've seen gore. See this. Or better, do not see this.
  • The Invitation (2015/ USA) by Karyn Kusama: This movie, set over a dinner at one location, is more of a mystery-thriller than horror. But the experience is horrifying for sure. It does not really answer all questions its plot raises, but does hint at ritualistic human sacrifice, kind-of-satan-worship and things like that, done in a modern urban context.
  • Suspiria (1977/ Italy) by Dario Argento: Everything about this movie is loud. Colors. Sound. Score. Performances. It may look like a B-grade witch-movie, but its aesthetic choices are impressive and impactful. No wonder it is considered an influential film of the genre.
  • Trouble Every Day (2001/ France) by Claire Denis: A bizarre and surrealistic take on the vampire sub-genre, this film again manages to put the blame on humans and humans alone. Do not look for plot here. There is one and in the end you will have a sense of a story. But most story-elements remain unexplained. It also has some really disturbing sequences you may want to stay away from. And it is directed by one of the most reputed female directors of our time.

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